All India Radio Allahabad                      

Audio Version | Hindi Font

HISTORY

History

Allahabad is at the confluence of the rivers Ganga and Yamuna, Allahabad is amongst the oldest cities in India and also one of its most prominent pilgrim centres. In mythology its origin is traced to a Yagna, Prakrista Yagna, performed here by Lord Brahma, the creator God of Hindu trinity from that it received its ancient name Prayag. Allahabad is the premier centre for the Kumbh Mela performed every 12 years for which people and sages from all over the country and abroad congregate at the confluence for a holy dip in the sacred waters.

Allahabad is a site of great religious significance located at the confluence of the River Ganges and the River Yamuna. Known as Prayag since the Aryan times, it was captured by the Mughals in the sixteenth century and in 1584 was renamed Allahabad by Emperor Akbar.

Allahabad played host to many events that were key in shaping Indian history. It came under British governance in 1801 after the nawab of Avadh ceded it to the British. It was here at the Durbar (court) of Lord Canning that Queen Victoria's proclamation transferring control from the East India Company to Britain, making Indian a colony of the Crown, was made. This event took place in 1858, after the Indian uprising of 1857.

The first meeting of the Indian National Congress was held here in 1885 and it then became the Congress party headquarters. Mahatma Gandhi proposed his plan for nonviolent resistance at a conference here in 1920. Allahabad is also the birthplace of Jawaharlal Nehru, India's first prime minister.

Like many other cities, the architectural heritage in Allahabad provides snapshots of Indian history. The Allahabad fort located at the confluence of the two rivers was built under Emperor Akbar. Within the fort is an Ashokan pillar that dates to third century BC. The tomb of the elder brother of Emperor Shah Jahan in Khusrau Bagh is an elegant Mughal structure. There are many buildings from the colonial period; notable are the Gothic All Saints' Cathedral Thornhill and Mayne Memorial library, and the Indo-Islamic Muir College.

Allahabad today is one of the largest cities of Uttar Pradesh and a major Hindu pilgrimage site. The annual bathing festival, the Magh Mela, is held in January when it is believed that the mythical Sarasvati River (River of Enlightenment) joins at the confluence. The Maha Kumbh Mela held once every twelve years attracts millions, who come to bath in the Ganges between January and February when it is believed that the water of the Ganges is transformed to nectar and washes away all sins.

It is 98 m above sea level. Allahabad lies 135 km west of Varanasi in the north Indian state of Uttar Pradesh and the city of Allahabad is situated at the confluence of the Ganga, Yamuna and Saraswati rivers.

Geography and Environment

Allahabad is at a height of 98 Meter above Sea Level and it is Lying Between parallels of 24045’ and 25045’ north latitude and that of 81008’ and 82021’ east meridian longitude.

Allahabad is landlocked to the north by Partapgarh and to the east by Mirzapur with the Banda district representing its southern boundary, and finally Fatehpur to the west. Geographically, we can divide the district in terms of its two major rivers - the Ganges and the Yamuna - into three areas. The Doab is the first of these subdivisions. Triangular in shape and land-locked between the two rivers, it is a relatively fertile land with patches of forests on its elevated plains and featureless ravines closer to its mainland.

The second major geographical subdivision of the district is called the Trans-Ganges tract. While well-wooded and more fertile than the Doab and containing many swamp areas near which rice is grown, its southern portion contains some 60,000 acres of barren land; this does not include other uncultivable land permanently occupied by roads, railways, and such. The final area under consideration is the Trans-Yamuna tract of land; this is where the largest presence of barren land (70,000 acres) is to be found, despite also having the widest area of physical attributes. From this brief description, then, we can begin to see a pattern of land scarcity that surely has a guiding role in the organization of economic and social activity among the peoples of this district.

Agriculture and Commerce

The agricultural and commercial activities in the Allahabad district are largely influenced by the geographic and climactic conditions of this region. The one remaining factor that delineates economic activity is the social caste system of India. One recognizable feature of Allahabad is the regularity of the rains that are received, averaging some 38 inches per annum. This ensures that a predictable harvest can happen, one upon which local economic activity is planned. As hinted earlier, the lack of cultivable land results in high commodity prices due to scarcity to which we must also add a relatively dense population. Rice, wheat, barley and various autumn pulses represent the mainstay of the crops in this district. Opium and hemp is also cultivated in significant numbers.

The district benefits, since the great famine of 1896-97, which was due in part to decreased precipitation, from an extensive network of wells and reservoirs, which are needed for the intensive rice cultivation.

In terms of keeping livestock as an economic activity, this is largely present in the Trans-Yamuna tract: extensive pastures have been utilized for the breeding of buffaloes and bulls. Fisheries are another important source of food for many. Though, Industry and factory is negligible in Allahabad: metals and the manufacture/repair of military equipment as well as the production of tiles, indigo and bricks make up the majority of the work.

Trade, which is very limited in terms of imports & exports, oil-seeds imports from Banda district (by river), grain from the north in Partapgarh across the Ganges, in addition to metals, salt and other goods from elsewhere. The main exports are cotton, sugar, grain and ghee. The final remark to be made concerns the "sanctity" of Allahabad as a prime center of pilgrimage within the entire Uttar Pradesh. Tradition, therefore, plays an important role for the local population, to which we will now turn.

Population

The population of Allahabad city is 1,042,229 as per the 2001 census and it lists as the 32nd most populous city in India. The area of Allahabad city is about 65 sq. km whereas the area of Allahabad district is 5482 sq. km. Language spoken in and around Allahabad include Hindi, Urdu, Illahabadi (local dialect), and English. The dialect of Hindi spoken in Allahabad is Awadhi, although Khariboli is most commonly used in their city area. Hinduism is the largest religious affiliation with around 1.4 million believers, followed by Islam (126,203) and Christianity (1,300).

Literacy in Allahabad district is comparatively high and has made huge progress over the years. As per census 2001, 75.81% male and 46.38% of females are literate and total literacy rate id 62.11% as compared to 7.96% of male and 0.56% of female in 1901.

Time to visit

The best time to visit Allahabad is during the winters between November and March. The Magh Mela in January is an important religious event for Hindus

Places of tourist attraction

Sangam
The sacred 'Sangam' is the confluence of three of the holiest rivers in Hindu mythology Ganga, Yamuna and the mythical underground river of enlightenment, Saraswati. At the confluence, the muddy waters of the Ganges and the clear green water of the Yamuna can be distinctly seen to merge into one. Bathing at the Sangam is believed to be auspicious through out the year especially for 15 days in the month of Magh (mid-January to Mid-February) during 'Magh Mela' and longer during Maha Kumbh Mela held every 12 years. Astrologers calculate the holiest time to enter the water and draw up a 'Holy Dip Schedule'. Maha Kumbh Mela attracts millions of devout Hindus and a holy dip then is believed to cleanse the soul. An enormous temporary township springs up on the vacant land on the Allahabad side of the river.

Allahabad Fort

The massive majestic fort built by Emperor Akbar in 1583 A.D fort stands on the banks of the Yamuna near the confluence. The largest of Akbar's forts, it was matchless in its design and construction. Now used by the army, prior permission is needed for a visit except for a limited area open to visitors. The fort has massive walls and three gateways flanked by high towers. Inside the fort there is the Zenana (harem) and the 3rd century BC Ashoka pillar moved to the fort from Kausambi, 'Saraswati Koop'; a well, said to be the source of the Saraswati River, Patalpuri, the underground temple and the much-revered 'Akshaya Vata' or immortal Banyan tree within the temple.

The Ashoka pillar standing 10.6 meters high has several edicts and a Persian inscription of Emperor Jahangir encrypted on it, commemorating his accession to the throne.

Khusrau Bagh

Khusrau Bagh located near the railway station, contains the tomb of Prince Khusrau son of the Mughal emperor Jehangir, who was jailed and executed after an unsuccessful rebellion and a plot to assassinate his father. The typical Mughal Garden enclosure is entered through an 18m high archway. Nearby is the tomb believed to be his sisters and the two storied tomb of his Rajput mother.

Allahabad Museum

Allahabad Museum located at Kamala Nehru Road inside Chandra Shekhar Azad Park, has 18 galleries containing a wide range of stone sculptures. The sculptures include 2nd BC pieces from Bharhut and Kausambi, 1st Century AD Kushana from Mathura, 4th-6th century Gupta and 11th century carvings from Khajuraho. The exhibit also has terracotta figurines from Kausambi, Rajasthani Miniatures, coins and paintings by Nicholas Roerich and artifacts donated by the Nehru family.

Open daily from 10:30 am to 4:30 PM except Mondays.

Anand Bhawan

Anand Bhavan was the former ancestral home of the Nehru family. Donated to the Indian government in 1970 by Indira Gandhi, it was turned into a museum. The exhibits in the two-storied building seen through glass panels include personal items of Motilal Nehru, Jawaharlal Nehru; the first Prime Minister of Independent India, Mrs. Indira Gandhi (Prime Minister Jan 24, 1966 - March 24, 1977, Jan 14, 1980 – Dec 2, 1984) and her sons Sh. Sanjay Gandhi and Sh. Rajeev Gandhi (Prime Minister Oct 31, 1984 – Dec 2, 1989). One can see the room where Mahatma Gandhi used to stay during his visits, Mr. Jawarlal Nehru's room and study also.

Open: 9:30 am to 05:00 pm. except Mondays.

There is a Jawahar planetarium build in 1979 in the compound.
Open 11:00 am to 04:00 pm. except Mondays

 

Swaraj Bhawan

Situated next to Anand Bhawan, Swaraj Bhavan was donated to the Nation by Sh. Moti Lal Nehru to be used as the headquarters of the Congress Committee. Late Prime Minister of India, Mrs. Indira Gandhi was born here.

Open: 09:30 am to 05:30 P.M. Closed on Monday's.


Muir Central College - University of Allahabad

Designed by William Emerson and opened in 1886, the college is a fine example of 'Indo-saracenic' architecture. It has a 200 feet tower made of pale-yellow sandstone with marble and mosaic floors. It was later established as the University of Allahabad, one of the most reputed Universities of India. The University has Kausambi Museum with various artifacts from Kausambi including pottery, Terracotta figurines, coins, beads and bangles.


Minto Park or Madan Mohan Malviya Park

Minto Park is located to the west of the fort near the Yamuna River. It was here that the East India Company officially handed over control of India to the British government in 1858. Lord Canning read out the declaration. There is a stone memorial with a four-lion symbol on top here.

Chandra Shekhar Azad Park 

Earlier known as Alfred Park, this extensive garden park has some fine colonial Buildings, including a public library. Later the park was renamed in honour of the freedom fighter Chandra Shekhar Azad who laid his life fighting with the imperialists. Within the park is the Allahabad Museum

Other places nearby Allahabad

Jhusi
Situated 9 km from Allahabad, Jhusi (Pratisthanpuri) is a place for people wanting peace of mind and soul. It has many ashrams and temples and can be reached from Allahabad by taxis, buses, and boats, etc.

Kaushambi
Kaushambi (62 km) is a place traditionally associated with the Mahabharata. The city was once a great Buddhist center. Lord Buddha is believed to have visited Kaushambi twice to deliver discourses. The ruins of an ancient fort bear witness to the antiquity of the place. There are also remains of a monastery.

Bhita
Bhita (20 km) is an archeological site with remains dating back to 300 b.c.

Shringverpur
Shringverpur (40 km) was once the capital city of the kingdom of Nishadraj (King of Boatmen). Legend has it that Lord Rama stayed here overnight while going to the forest. Before steering Rama across the Ganga in his boat, his feet were washed by Nishadraj.

Other places that can be visited include Tons river aqueduct, Kara, and Upardaha Lake.

Allahabad City

Located in the easternmost portion of the Allahabad division within the United Provinces, the district of Allahabad presents us with a fairly accurate picture of the lives of most Indians living around the time of the turn of the century.

In terms of administration, Allahabad city is the headquarters of the district and the seat of government of the United Provinces. As such, it is one of the largest urban areas in the entire province. The city is located on the left bank of the Jumna River. The population, as of 1901, was some 172,000 with the majority of them Hindu but with a significant Muslim minority of 50,000. The city is a great point of assembly for religious pilgrimages, with up to a million people bathing and celebrating in the great rivers of Allahabad.

Where the city lacks in terms of trade or recognizable historic buildings it makes up for in its educational institutions. Allahabad is the most important center for education within the united provinces. The Muir College (founded in 1872), the Allahabad Christian College (1902) and the Kayastha Pathshala, with the number of students ranging between 50 and 350, all attest to the importance of higher learning to Allahabad. The city is also home to numerous English language newspapers such as the Pioneer, which is the more prominent among them.

LOCAL FESTIVALS

Kumbh Mela

The Kumbh Mela, believed to be the largest religious gathering on earth is held every 12 years on the banks of the 'Sangam'- the confluence of the holy rivers Ganga, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswathi. The Mela alternates between Nasik, Allahabad, Ujjain and Haridwar every three years. The one celebrated at the Holy Sangam in Allahabad is the largest and holiest of them. The Mela is attended by millions of devotees including Sadhus. A holy dip in the sacred waters is believed to cleanse the soul. The Sangam comes alive during Kumbh and Ardh Kumbh with an enormous temporary township springing up on the vacant land on the Allahabad side of the river.


The legend goes thus- the gods and the demons fight for a pot of nectar (Amrit Kumbh): the nectar of immortality. Lord Vishnu, disguising himself as an enchantress (Mohini), seized the nectar from the demons. While fleeing from the evil ones, Lord Vishnu passed the nectar on to his winged mount, Garuda. The demons finally caught up with Garuda and in the ensuing struggle, a few drops of the precious nectar fell on Allahabad, Nasik, Haridwar and Ujjain. Since then, the Kumbh Mela has been held in all these places, alternatively, every 12 years.

Ardh Kumbh Mela and Magh Mela 

The Ardh or half Kumbh is held every six years on the banks of Sangam. Second only to the Kumbh in sanctity, the Ardh Kumbh also attracts devouts in millions, from all over the world. Magh Mela is an annual event held at the Sangam

Dussehra
Dussehra of Allahabad is unique. During Dussehra, beautifully decorated "Chowkis" (tableau) are taken out from different localities, depicting various scenes from Indian mythology. Every 'Chowki' is decorated tastefully and there is a competitive spirit  in bringing out the most beautiful 'Chowki'.

Allahabad - at a glance                                                                                   (Table – 1)

 

  Unit

No.

Geographical area

Population

Male

Female

Schedule caste

Schedule tribe

Literacy rate

Male

Female

Total cultivated land (2005 - 06)

Irrigated land (2005 - 06)

Gross irrigated land (2005 - 06)

Total length of roads

Sq Km. 

In thousands

-------do----------

-------do----------

-------do----------

-------do----------

Percent

-------do----------

-------do----------

Thousand hectare

-------do----------

-------do----------

       Km. 

 

5482

4936.11

2626.45

2309.32

1065.10

       4.27

62.11

75.81

46.38

324

249

371

4533

Area under main crops                                                                                (Table – 2)

Year 2005-06

Area (in Hectare)

Percent

Paddy

Wheat

Barley

Jowar

Bajra

Other cereals

Pulses

Potato

                       TOTAL AREA

1,68,344

2,11,798

5360

5708

27,762

21,262

51,794

11,993

5,03.951

33.4%

42.0%

1.1%

1.1%

5.5%

4.2%

10.3%

2.4%

100%

Linguistic Composition of Allahabad district                                        (Table – 3) 

(Census 1991)

Hindi

4684572

95.20%

Urdu

222932

4.53%

Punjabi

2885

0.06%

Bengali

3849

0.08%

Other

6321

0.13%

 

Religion-wise Composition of Allahabad district                                    (Table – 4) 

(Census 2001)

RELIGION

Total

Rural

Urban

Percentage

Hindu

4284834

3362967

921867

86.81%

muslim

627735

355227

272508

12.72%

Christian

9114

3088

6026

0.18%

Sikh

6518

2951

3567

0.13%

Buddhist

2150

1708

442

0.04%

Janis

2144

742

1402

0.04%

Other

279

37

242

0.01%

Does not tell their religion

3331

2600

731

0.08%

Uttar PRADESH - at a glance     

            

Items and Units

 

 

Period

Particulars

1

2

3

1. Geographical area (sq.Km.)

2001

240928*

2. Population (Lakh)

2001

166053*

Male

,,

87466*

Females

,,

78587*

3. Females Per 1,000

2001

898*

males (No.)

 

 

4. Density of population (per sq.km.)

2001

689*

5. Percentage growth of

1991-2001

25.80*

population

 

 

(a) Division (No.)

2002

17

6.(b) Districts (No.)

2002

70

(c) Tahsils (No.)

2000

299

(d) Towns & U.A. (No.)

2002

682

(e) Development

2002

813

Blocks (No.)

 

 

7.(a) Nyaya Panchayat (No.)

2001

8135

(b) Gram Panchayat (No.)

2001

52029

(c) Populated villages (No.)

1991

97134

(d) Depopulated villages(No.)

1991

10193

(e) Forest villages(No.)

1991

114

(f) Total Villages(No.)

1991

107327

(g) Households (thousand)

1991

21050

8. State Income

 

 

(a) State Income at 1993-94 prices (Crore Rs.)

2000-01

93865

 

2001-02

99050

(b)  Per capita income at 1993-94 Prices (Rs.)

2000-01

5707

 

2001-02

5885+

9. State Budget* (Crore Rs.)

 

 

(a) Revenue Receipt

2002-2003

31370

(b) Revenue Expenditure

,,

36646

(c) Surplus

,,

(-)5276

(d) Capital Expenditure

,,

4102

(e) Plan Expenditure

,,

4759

10. Agriculture :

 

 

(a) Net Area sown (Lakh Hectare)

2000-2001

168

(b) Area sown more than once (Lakh Hectare)

,,

85

(c) Percentage of area sown more than once

2000-2001

50.6

to net area sown

 

 

(d) Net Irrigated area (Lakh hactares)

,,

124

(e) Percentage of net irrigated to net area

,,

73.7

sown(Laks Hecare)

 

 

11. Irrgation :

 

 

Percentage distribution of net area irrigated

 

 

by different sources

 

 

(a) Canals

2000-2001

22.2

(b) Tube wells

,,

72.1

(c) Wells

,,

305

(d) Tanks and Lakes

,,

0.5

(e) Others

,,

1.7

12. State tubewells

1999-2000

29215*

working (No.)

200-2001

28551

 

2001-2002

28381

13.Total length of

1996-1997

74816*

irrigation canals (k.m.)

1997-1998

75147*

 

1998-1999

74742*

14. Production of agricultural commodities

 

 

(Lakh M.Ton)

 

 

(a) Food-grains

2000-2001

42736

(b) Oil-seeds

,,

710

(c) Sugarcane

,,

106068

(d) Potato

,,

8398

15. No. of Trainees under  the fruit preservation

2001-2002

34758

 training programme

 

 

16. Animal Husbandry

 

 

|.(a) Total Livestock(Lakh)

1997

564

(b) Poultry(Lakh)

,,

121

||(a) Vaterinary Hospitals (No.)

2001-2002

1758

(b) Livestock development centres(No.)

 

2557

Gases Treated(Lakh)

 

173

17. State Forest :

 

 

(a) Area(Th.Hect.)

2001-2002

1689

(b) Out turn of

 

 

(I) Timber (Th.cu.metre)

2001-2002

186

(ii) Fuel wood (Th.cu.metre)

,,

32

(iii) Bamboos(Lakh)

,,

3758

(iv) Bhabhar grass (Th. Quintals)

,,

12

(v)Tendu leaf (Th.quintals)

,,

208

18.Bank :

 

 

(I) Bank offices (No.)

2001-2002

8178

(ii) Population per

,,

21

Bank offices(Thousand)

 

 

(iii) Per capita deposit (Rs.)

,,

5865

19. Co-operation :

 

 

(a) Apex societies (No.)

2001-2002

10*

(b) Central societies (No.)

 

205*

(c) Primary Agricultural credit socities (No.)

 

7479*

(b) Primary societies (No.)

 

18127*

(e) Milk societies (No.)

 

13052

(f) Housing societies (No.)

 

2670

20. Joint stock company working (No.)

2001-2002

21785

21. Labour & Employment :

 

 

(i) Regi.factories (No.)

1998-99

13816

(ii) Trade unions(No.)

2002

3415

(iii) Employment exchange :

 

 

(i) Candidates regd. (th.)

2001

361.6

(ii) Candidates placed (th.)

,,

3.5

(v) State government employees (Th.)

2000

839

22. Industrial Production :

 

 

(a) Cement (Th.M.T.)

2000-2001

740

(b) Vanspati oil (Th.M.T.)

1998-1999

238

(c) Cotton cloth (Lakh sq.M.)

2000-2001

287

(d) Cotton yarn (Th.M.T.)

2000-2001

51

(e) Sugar + (Th.M.T.)

2000-2001

4616

23. Electricity :

 

 

(a) Installed capacity (M.W.)

2000-2001

5613

(b)(i) Generation + (Crore K.W.H.)

,,

2283

(ii) Per capita Generation of electricity(K.W.H)

,,

137

(i) Consumption + (Crore K.W.H.)

2000-2001

2286

(ii)Per capita Consumption(K.W.H.)

2000-2001

138

(c) Total electrified

 

 

(i) Villages (No.)

2001-2002

76999

(ii) Scheduled castes

2001-2002

59483

Bastis (No.)

 

 

24. Education :

 

 

(a) Literacy percentage

 

 

(i) Male

2001

70.23

(ii) Female

,,

42.98

(iii) All

,,

57.36

(b) Junior Basic

 

 

Education (Th.)*

 

 

(i) Institutions

2001-02

89

(ii) Teachers

2001-02

294

(iii) Students -

 

 

1-Boys

2001-2002

8300

2-Girls

2001-2002

4602

(c) Senior Basic education(Th.)*

 

.

(i) Institutions

2001-2002

20

(ii) Teachers

2001-2002

100

(iii) Students -

 

 

1-Boys

2001-2002

2052

2-Girls

2001-2002

924

(d) Higher Secondary education(Th.)*

 

 

(i) Institutions

2001-02

9

(ii) Teachers

2001-02

127

(iii) Students -

 

 

1-Boys

2001-2002

3887

2-Girls

2001-2002

1630

25.Public Health :

 

 

(a) Allopathic (State)-

 

 

(i) Hospitals and Dispensaries (No.)

01/01/2002

4236

(ii) Beds (No.)

01/01/2002

55684

(b) Ayurvedic and Yunani -

 

 

(i) Hospitals and Dispensaries (No.)

2001-2002

2210

(ii) Beds (No.)

2001-2002

10251

(c) Homeopathic-

 

 

(i) Hospitals and Dispensaries (No.)

2001-2002

1342

(ii) Beds (No.)

2001-2002

383

26. Family welfare :

 

 

(a) Sterlisation (Thousand)

 

 

(i) Male

2001-2002

2

(ii) Female

2001-2002

416

(b) I.V.G.D.cases(Th.)

2001-2002

2256

27. (i) Birth rate (Per thousand)

2000

32.8

(ii) Death rate (Per thousand)

2000

10.3

28. Surfaced road maintained by P.W.D.(km.)

2000-2001

100136

(a) National Highways

2000-2001

2949

(b) State Highways

2000-2001

9939

(c) Other district roads

2000-2001

87248

29. Motor vehicles on roads (Thousand)

 

87248

(a) Govt.Buses

2001-2002

5

(b) Private

 

 

(i) Buses

2001-2002

25

(ii) Trukcs

2001-2002

116

(iii) Taxies

2001-2002

95

(iv) Cars

2001-2002

322

(v) Motor cycles

2001-2002

3835

(vi) Tractors

2001-2002

677

(vii) Others

2001-2002

100

30. State Road

 

 

Transport :

 

 

(a) Routes at the end of the year (No.)

2001-2002

1834

(b) Total route length at the end of the year (Th.km.)

2001-2002

389

 31. Communication :

 

 

(a) Working telephones (No.)

2001-2002

2836402

(b) Telephone exchanges (No.)

2001-2002

3117

(c) Post offices (No.)

2001-2002

17627

32. Indices :

 

 

(a) Agricultural production volume index(1994-93=100)

1999-2000

117.88

 

2000-2001

112.1

(b) Wholesale price index(1994-93=100)

2001-2002

1142.2

(c) Working class

2000

428

consumer price index at Kanpur (1982=100)

2001

447

(d) Urban(Non-manual) employees consumer

2001

360

price index at Lucknow (1984-85=100)

 

 

(e) Urban consumer price index (Ag.Yr.) (1970-71=100)

2001-2002

1150.3

(f) Rural consumer price index(Ag.Yr.) (1970-71=100)

2001-2002

1039.8

(g) Agricultural parity index (1970-71=100)

2000-2001

77.4

 

2001-2002

79.8

33. National savings

 

 

(Net deposits) (Lakh Rs.)

2001-2002

483031

34. Economic census :

 

 

(a) No. of total enterprices (Thousand)

1998

2828

(b) No. of persons usually working (Thousand)

1998

6928

(c) Whom number hired(Thousand)

1998

3112

35. Five-year Planwise expenditure(Crore Rs.)

 

 

(a) First Plan

1951-56

153

(b) Second Plan

1956-61

233

(c) Third Plan

1961-66

561

(d) Annual Plans

1966-69

455

(e) FourthPlan

1969-74

1166

(f) Fifth Plan

1974-79

2909

(g) Annual Plans

1979-80

829

(h) Sixth Plan

1980-85

6594

(i) Seventh Plan

1985-90

11949

(j) Annual Plans

1990-92

6904

(k) Eights Plan

1992-97

21680

(l) Ninth Plan

1997-98

5034

(m) "     "

1998-99

5649

(n) "      "

 1999-00

5843

(o) "      "

2000-01

5956

(p) "      "

2001-02

6647

Entertainment

 

 

(a) Cinema houses (No.)

2001-2002

972

(b) Seating capacity (Thousand)

2001-2002

635

Piped and ground water facility provided

 

 

Hamlets totally cevered (No.)

2001-2002

243508

(ii) Towns (No.)

2001-2002

619

No. of Tourists in U.P.(Lakh)

2000

723.08

(i) Indian

2000

714.74

(ii) Foreigners

2000

8.34

*Provisional

 

 

 +Quick estimates

 

 

* Budget estimates

 

 

*Including Uttaranchal

 

 

* Excluding Defence installations

 

+From October to September

 

 

                                                                

Linguistic composition of Uttar Pradesh

 

Uttar Pradesh constituted 16.17% of total population in India, which is highest of any other state in India. Basically, Hindi is most popular speaking language used by 89.68% of the total population followed by Urdu (9.74%) and Punjabi (0.40%). Significant number of people used other languages also reside in Uttar Pradesh like Bengali (0.09%), Sindhi (0.03%), Marathi (0.01%) and Malayalam (0.01%). Only 0.04% people followed other language for speaking like Tamil, Gujarati, Telgu, Oriya and Kashmiri etc.

 

Existing AIR network in Uttar Pradesh

 

Primary channel                             Power                        FM Transmitters            Power     

 

1.        Lucknow                              300 KW MW                   1.  Lucknow                  10 KW FM

2.        Allahabad                              20 KW MW                   2.  Allahabad                10 KW FM

3.        Varanasi                              100 KW MW                   3.  Aligarh                      6 KW FM

4.        Rampur                                 20 KW MW                   4.  Bareilly                      6 KW FM

5.        Kanpur                                    1 KW MW                   5.  Faizabad                   6 KW FM

6.        Mathura                                  1 KW MW                    6. Jhansi                        6 KW FM

7.        Gorkhpur                            100 KW MW                    7.  Obra                          6 KW FM

8.        Najibabad                           100 KW MW                    8.  Gorkhpur                   1 KW FM

9.        Agra                                      20 KW MW

 

 

Demographical details of the districts under coverage area

 

            There are mainly five districts namely Allahabad, Banda, Kaushambi, Mirzapur and Pratapgarh come under the coverage area of All India Radio, Allahabad out of 70 districts in UP. The details about the districts are given below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOP TEN PROGRAMME OF Primary Channel, AIR, ALLAHABAD

                                                                                                          (Based on RAS 2006 Survey Report)

(Table- 10)

S.No.

Time

Name of the Programme

 %age of listening

Urban

1

12.30

Hello Anurodh (Tuesday)

53.00

2

9.30

Chitrapatt Sangeet (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday)

45.70

3

17.15

Yuvvani

33.60

4

12.30

Film Song

29.40

5

8.00

Saachar Prabhat

29.30

6

6.15

Vichar Bindu (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday)

26.00

7

20.45

Hindi Samachar

24.70

8

6.20

Aradhana

23.10

9

6.45

Aas Pass

22.90

9

9.05

Lok Geet

22.90

10

10.10

Ek hi film se

21.30

Rural

1

12.30

Hello Anurodh (Tuesday)

60.00

2

9.30

Chitrapatt Sangeet (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday)

45.00

3

8.00

Samachar Prabhat

34.40

4

17.15

Yuvvani

34.00

5

6.20

Aradhana

27.80

6

9.10

Rahi E Matwale (Sunday)

26.70

7

9.05

Lok Geet

26.40

8

16.00

Pradeshik Samachar

25.30

8

20.45

Hindi Samachar

25.30

9

12.30

Film Song (Monday, Wednesday, Sunday)

24.60

10

7.00

Hindi Samachar

24.40

Combined

1

12.30

Hello Anurodh (Tuesday)

56.50

2

9.30

Chitrapatt Sangeet (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday)

45.30

3

17.15

Yuvvani

33.80

4

8.00

Samachar Prabhat

31.90

5

12.30

Film Song (Monday, Wednesday, Sunday)

27.00

6

6.20

Aradhana

25.40

7

20.45

Hindi Samachar

25.00

8

9.05

Lok Geet

24.70

9

6.15

Vichar Bindu (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday)

23.00

10

9.10

Rahi E Matwale (Sunday)

22.00

 

 

 

 

TOP TEN PROGRAMME OF CBS, AIR, ALLAHABAD

                                                                                                (Based on CBS- RAS 2007 Survey Report)

(Table- 11)

S.No. 

Time 

Name of the Programme 

 %age of listening 

Urban  

1

10.10

Phone Time (Friday)

63.00

2

18.15

Phone in Apki Pasand (Friday)

63.00

3

11.30

Apki Pasand (Tuesday)

54.00

4

16.00

Pitara

50.30

5

7.55

Chitrapatt Sangeet

46.50

6

19.05

Jaymala

45.80

7

21.30

Aaj ke fankar (Tuesday, Friday, Saturday)

43.30

8

10.10

Sabrang (Tuesday)

43.00

9

12.00

Suhana Safar (Tuesday, Friday, Saturday)

41.70

10

13.30

Manchahe Geet

41.50

10

21.00

Ek hi film se

41.50

Rural  

1

10.10

Phone Time (Friday)

56.00

2

18.15

Apki Pasand (Tuesday)

53.00

3

11.00

Lokgeet

46.00

4

18.15

Phone in Apki Pasand (Friday)

45.00

5

10.10

Sabrang (Tuesday)

44.00

6

7.55

Chitrapatt Sangeet

43.00

7

8.15

Chitralok

37.50

8

16.00

Pitara

36.00

9

19.05

Jaymala

35.50

10

11.00

Natak

35.00

Combined  

1

10.10

Phone Time (Friday)

59.50

2

18.15

Phone in Apki Pasand (Friday)

54.00

3

11.30

Apki Pasand (Tuesday)

53.50

4

7.55

Chitrapatt Sangeet

44.80

5

10.10

Sabrang (Tuesday)

43.50

6

16.00

Pitara

43.10

7

19.05

Jaymala

40.60

8

11.00

Lokgeet

38.00

9

21.30

Aaj ke fankar (Tuesday, Friday, Saturday)

37.80

9

8.15

Chitralok

37.80

10

12.00

Suhana Safar (Tuesday, Friday, Saturday)

37.50

Dated 2010-02-26 15:08:38, Updated 2011-09-12 10:41:00, Accessed 2014-07-29 15:53:16, Hits 4382
Other links: Contact Numbers, Contact Us, Facilities, How to Reach, Staff